2017 Abstracts

Dig Deeper into Self-Regulated Learning!  

Here is your opportunity to meet informally with our keynote speaker, ask questions, and discuss specific self-regulated learning activities you would like to try with your students.

“Welcome to My World!”:  When the Educator Becomes the Student

Abstract:
During the spring semester of 2017, I enrolled in a General Psychology course at my institution. In this session, I will share my reflections after participating as a student in this course. In the first part of this session, I will tell the story of why and how I enrolled in this course, and I will share the challenges and successes it presented to me. I will discuss the insights I gained about the student experience and workload, the learning and study skills I teach, and my own capabilities. In the second part of the session, there will be open discussion about courses attendees have considered, or might consider, taking. Participants are asked to bring a laptop, tablet, or smartphone, if possible.

Using Motivational Interviewing with Students At-Risk and on Academic Probation

Abstract:
Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a “non-directive” technique used in counseling. Participants in this workshop will learn about the MI approach, hear how it is being used at one university, examine case studies, and experience first-hand (through role play) an MI-based interaction from both the student’s and the professional’s perspectives. We will explore how MI can be used in college settings to assist students at-risk for failure. MI can help them recognize and overcome the ambivalence that keeps them stuck in self-defeating behaviors and prevents them from making changes in their academic lives. The workshop will end with questions and ideas for application in participants’ own settings.

Screencasting: Providing Students with Enhanced Feedback

Abstract:
Screencasting offers the ability to video/audio detailed instructor feedback on student assignments. In this presentation, we will do the following: show examples of screencasting, anchor the intellectual argument for using screencasting, share examples of student reactions to screencasting, and focus on using screencasting for writing and revision. Presented by both a teacher and a student, this presentation seeks to include voices from the classroom in order to share not only a teacher’s implementation of the strategy, but a student’s response to working with screencasts.

iPads Ease Students into Assistive Technology

Abstract:
Since 1999, we at Landmark have been teaching a suite of Assistive Technology (AT) tools on personal computers. These tools, which are necessary for students who learn differently, can be useful for all learners—a key tenet of universal design. With the advent of the iPad, incorporating AT is easy, fun, and painless! In this workshop, we will demonstrate iPad apps that offer learning support, including text-readers; voice-recognition software; and tools for writing, note-taking, mind-mapping, organizing, and studying. Participants will break into small groups based on the tool they are most interested in learning more about; they will download and explore an app or brainstorm how they can use it in their setting. If possible, bring your iPad.

Engaging Your Audience with Technology

Abstract:
Most instructors know to avoid “death by PowerPoint.” So how can we use technology to interact with a class full of students? How can we create meaningful and engaging presentations? How can we receive and provide immediate, useful feedback from a class? Research has shown that formative assessment improves student engagement and learning gains. This workshop will use Kahoot and PollEverywhere, two free formative assessment technologies. Participants will have the opportunity to see these technologies in action. There will also be time to brainstorm and create the framework for an interactive presentation.

Academic Coaching: Developing and Implementing a New Model

Abstract:
In order to increase our support of Regis students, our department recently developed and rolled out a new academic coaching model. In this session, we will provide an overview of our institution and academic support programs, describe the process we undertook to develop the new model, and present the new model. We will share the theories underpinning the model, the model’s structure (individual coaching, learning communities, and workshops), examples of the curriculum, and our data collection methods. We will also discuss our successes and failures. Session participants will be invited to consider and share how elements of this model could be incorporated into their own work.

Undergraduate Research: Building a Foundation of Inquiry, Part I

Abstract:
This workshop is the first of a two-part series. Participants are welcome to attend one or both sessions. In this session, students will discuss their work in an undergraduate research project. Each presenter will briefly share his/her experiences, followed by a question-and-answer period. Please note that research projects can take place in the classroom, in administrative offices where students work, in tutoring/writing centers, and in learning assistance programs. We’ll share evidence of research in these diverse settings. This session will appeal to students, classroom instructors, and administrators who may be interested in participating in or starting an undergraduate research project. Handouts with recommended readings and organizations/locations available to those working in undergraduate research will be provided.

Undergraduate Research: Building a Foundation of Inquiry, Part II

Abstract:
This workshop is the second of a two-part series. Participants are welcome to attend one or both sessions. In this session, students who participated in an undergraduate research project will share their most current work via a poster display, and they will be available to discuss both their research and their experiences at an individual level. Topics include the following: the concept of fostering student grit in the classroom, the role and implications of sexual assault on college campuses, the challenges of balancing student athletics and academics, and building educational after-school programs. Come hear how students benefited from, and were challenged by, their undergraduate research projects!

Recognizing and Rectifying the Plagiarism Epidemic

Abstract:

Plagiarism is a bigger problem than ever before; it is an epidemic that threatens the foundation of academic discourse. Easy access to technology enables students to produce professional sounding papers in a matter of minutes. Recognizing and addressing plagiarism in all its forms is essential to academic success. In this PowerPoint presentation, we will provide examples of the ways plagiarism goes undetected, and we’ll discuss how to detect and rectify the various types – from intentional to unintentional. Examples of plagiarism, personal narratives, and commonly used websites and apps will be shared.

Initiatives to Increase Student Completion of Developmental Courses

Abstract:
The purpose of this presentation is to review three major initiatives in our Developmental English classes: (1) a thematic approach that uses e-texts and other resources; (2) a collaboration between developmental English instructors and the library, which embeds intensive small group instruction in grammar, writing, and research; and (3) an English 099 and Sociology 101 Learning Community that allows students to earn college-level credits. An overview of these initiatives, curriculum review, assessment techniques, and sample lessons will be the focus of this presentation.

Sharing Strategies that Encourage Students to Become Readers

Abstract:
Reading is key to every student’s ability to understand and think critically about information, but students now entering undergraduate studies have difficulty discerning between credible information and information that is not well supported. In the first half of this session, the discussion leader will share strategies she has used to encourage students to read more and read more critically. In the second half, we will work in small groups, and participants will be invited to share their best practices. Participants will leave with practical ideas to try in the classroom.

Developmental Math at GCC: Speed It Up or Slow It Down

Abstract:
Members of the math department from a small community college in western Massachusetts will share their response to two competing needs: shortening the time students spend in developmental math classes (speed it up) and allowing more time for those who want it (slow it down). We’ll talk about the rationale behind the choices we’ve made, and we’ll share materials developed. We’ll also provide an overview of our developmental math program, and how the courses in our program meet various requirements. We’ll end by asking participants to share how their colleges “speed it up” and “slow it down.”